What food represents for you? Simple 8 Reasons Why a Plant-Based Diet is Good For You

“𝐘𝐨𝐮 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐞𝐚𝐭”  is probably the truest statement you will ever hear when it comes to your health and habits. It is not just a metaphor.
If you eat bad food, then you’re going to eventually look and feel bad. If you eat good healthy food, then you are going to look and feel great! 

You are what you eat

I am so honored to be part of TuttoFood collaboration – an international food fair in Milan on May 17-20, 2021. For the project Next Generation, our target is raising awareness of healthy eating, which is very important!⁣ This is why I will start sharing a weekly article talking about how you can learn improving your eating habits and hope what I share based on experience as a vegan and a certified RDN to provide a tool to start your journey as a vegan.

You need to think of your body as a machine that is constantly regenerating itself to keep all its parts in an optimal peek state of efficiency. If you feed it bad fuel (aka junk food ) It will produce unhealthy or weak cells because of the nature and poor nutrition of your diet.

FOOD REPRESENTS YOUR PERSONALITY! Plain and simple.
My advice is to EAT MORE ORGANIC FOODS AS POSSIBILE, MORE PLANT-BASED FOODS.

8 Reasons Why a Plant-Based Diet is Good For You

8 Reasons Why a Plant-Based Diet is Good For You

1. It keeps your weight down

Beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils are staples of a veg diet. Eating just 3/4  cup of these foods every day for six weeks can result in modest weight loss, even when a person’s diet was not restrictive calorie-wise, according to Canadian researchers.

2. It can reduce your risk of heart disease 

A diet that relies on plant-based foods compared to one based on animal-based foods may reduce the risks of dying from stroke and heart disease by an impressive 20 percent, according to the American Heart Association.

3. It can keep your blood pressure low

A group of researchers from Japan reviewing more than 258 studies found that consuming a vegetarian diet was associated with low blood pressure. The researchers concluded that a veg diet “could be a useful nonpharmacologic means for reducing blood pressure.”

4. It can lower your risk of colorectal cancer

The National Cancer Institute cites colorectal cancer as the third most common type of cancer in the United States. A recent study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine showed that people who ate a vegetarian diet had a 22 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer than those who didn’t. Vegetarians tend to consume more fiber from whole grains, veggies, and fruit.

5. It reduces your risk of diabetes complications

A veg diet can help reduce complications related to diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, eating vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, and nuts can improve blood-sugar control and make a diabetic’s body more responsive to insulin.

6. It can reduce breast-cancer risk

Teenage girls and young women who eat more high-fiber foods—particularly fruits and vegetables—may have a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer later in life, according to results from an analysis of more than 90,000 women from the Nurses’ Health Study.

7. It can reduce painful symptoms of arthritis

A veg diet lessens inflammation and arthritis symptoms, according to Nathan Wei, MD, director of the Arthritis Treatment Center in Frederick, MD. Meat-free diets decrease the production of proteins like cytokines that cause or aggravate inflammation.

8. And best of all, it can extend your life

A study conducted by researchers at Loma Linda University, in California, followed 73,000 Seventh-day Adventists between 2002 and 2007 and found that a vegetarian diet is associated with lower mortality—from all causes—than all other diets. 

6 Ways to Develop Healthy Eating Habits

Now that you understand why what you eat represents you, you still have time to start making healthy eating choices by developing healthy eating habits.

6 Ways to Develop Healthy Eating Habits

1. Get in balance.

Eat a diet that’s 45 percent carbs, 30 percent protein, and 35 percent good-for-you fats—olive oil, fish, or nuts. “Eating too little fat makes you feel deprived,” Forberg says. “Sprinkle almonds on your salad, put Parmesan cheese on your whole-wheat pasta, or slice avocado on your sandwich. Fat is a flavor carrier that helps other foods taste more robust.”

2. Avoid anything artificial.

Stick with real foods, such as vegetables, fruits, nuts, lean meats, low-fat dairy, and whole-grain pasta, rice, and bread. “The idea is to get the biggest nutrient bang for the calorie buck. Processed foods contain a lot of junk. Real foods are antioxidant-rich and fiber-filled.”

3. Pile on the green stuff.

“The bulk of your diet should be vegetables, such as tomatoes, mushrooms, zucchini, spinach, and other greens,” says Forberg. Vegetables are high in fiber and water, which fill you up. “You’ll be surprised by how much you can eat when you follow this plan.”

4. Keep a food journal.

“People who write down what they eat after every meal lose twice the weight of those who don’t.”

5. Set healthy limits.

“On the show, we recommend women consume 1,200 to 1,500 calories a day and men 1,600 to 2,400, depending on their size,” says Forberg. “If you’re super-tired, eat a little more. This is about making a lifestyle change and doing something that’s sustainable.”

6. Never let yourself get famished—or too full.

“When you’re super-hungry, you choose the wrong foods and eat too much. Stop when you’re comfortably full. You should never have to unbutton your pants!”

Eat more plants : vegetables, fruits, organic!

So next time you go shopping, grocery thinks twice about which products you are picking from the shelf and bringing to your home. Cause you are really what you eat and you need and must take care of your body!

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